Glossary

A glossary of terms related to walking. Compiled by the community.

Glossary of walking art

There are 9 definitions in this directory beginning with the letter P.
palsh
Walking slowly.
Submitted by: Paschale Straiton

Peace walking (or peacewalking)
Walking with the intention to foster unity amongst peoples (often done in organized groups) and/or as a meditative practice (usually done solo.)
Submitted by: Carolyn Affleck Youngs

Pedestrian Acts
By de Certeau: In “Walking in the City”, de Certeau conceives pedestrianism as a practice that is performed in the public space, whose architecture and behavioural habits substantially determine the way we walk. For de Certeau, the spatial order “organises an ensemble of possibilities (e.g. by a place in which one can move) and interdictions (e.g. by a wall that prevents one from going further)” and the walker “actualises some of these possibilities” by performing within its rules and limitations. “In that way,” says de Certeau, “he makes them exist as well as emerge.” Thus, pedestrians, as they walk conforming to the possibilities that are brought about by the spatial order of the city, constantly repeat and re-produce that spatial order, in a way ensuring its continuity. But, a pedestrian could also invent other possibilities. According to de Certeau, “the crossing, drifting away, or improvisation of walking privilege, transform or abandon spatial elements.” Hence, the pedestrians could, to a certain extent, elude the discipline of the spatial order of the city. Instead of repeating and re-producing the possibilities that are allowed, they can deviate, digress, drift away, depart, contravene, disrupt, subvert, or resist them. These acts, as he calls them, are pedestrian acts.
Submitted by: Asli Ozgen-Tuncer

pedestrianate
This word has been around since the mid-1800s. Here it is in an 1864 issue of the journal Notes & Queries: “I have been pedestrianating through a corner of Oxfordshire.” Credits to Mark Peters for these words mentioned in his article, see this.
Submitted by: Geert Vermeire

Pedinamento
A highly influential ideologue of neorealism, scriptwriter and director Cesare Zavattini suggested “pedinare,” the Italian word for stalking or shadowing, as a technique for filmmaking. Pedinare in cinema entailed “tailing someone like a detective, not determining what the character does but seeking to find out what is about to ensue.” The etymology of the word in Italian suggests “legwork” as it is derived from the Italian word for foot, “piede.” It is possible to suggest that the proliferation of images of walking in Italian Neorealism is closely linked to the technique of pedinamento, not because all neorealist filmmakers were followers of Zavattini, but because going out onto the street to encounter the everyday life of post-war Italian cities and creating cinematic tools to articulate these encounters were major concerns for the filmmakers of that era.
Submitted by: Asli Ozgen-Tuncer

Perambulator
PROJECTS AND EVENTS AROUND WALKING WITH PRAMS, PUSHCHAIRS AND BUGGIES (ETC.) instigated by artist Clare Qualmann
Submitted by: Claudia Zeiske

Place-awareness
The experience of a place informed by the meanings of place-names, ecology, ecopoetics, etc.
Submitted by: Alec Finlay

plodge
The Scottish and English word plodging has been wading through the lexical muck and mire since the late 1700s, and it refers to icky, slow, molasses-type walking. Plodge is probably a variation of plod. This word isn’t totally out of use, as a 1995 use from British magazine The Countryman illustrates: “Northbound Pennine Wayfarers, plodging through the interminable peat-bogs of the North Pennines.” Even if you have a spring in your step, it’s tough to skip merrily through the peat-bogs. Credits to Mark Peters for these words mentioned in his article, see this.
Submitted by: Geert Vermeire

Proxy walk
A descriptive walk done on behalf of a person who is bed/house-bound with illness in a landscape they recall.
Submitted by: Alec Finlay


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